Jim Carroll Speaks to TechAlliance

Canadian futurist Jim Carroll (@jimcarroll)just spoke about innovation at the London TechAlliance AGM. Here are some of the points that got my attention. (We used to call these sound bites or bullet points – I’ve already seem some of these show up in Tweets from the audience – so lets call these Slaw Tweets.)

Change is so rapid – 65% of public school children will be in a career that doesn’t exist yet.

1/2 of what science grads learn in first year is obsolete when they graduate.

Product lifecycles used to be measured in 2 digit years. The product lifecycle of a digital camera is 3 -6 months.

Big doesn’t beat small – fast beats slow.

We should choose not to participate in the recession – use it as an opportunity for growth.

A brand is no longer what you say it is – its what they say it is.

Experiential capital (accumulated experience trying to do things we have not done before) is crucial.

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Comments

  1. He still manages to stimulate after all these years …

    I would like to see some reliable authority for that line about half of what science grads learn in first year is obsolete when they graduate. It sounds highly unlikely to me, except perhaps in a tiny handful of cutting-edge disciplines. Can it be true in botany, or chemistry, or geology, or even physiology? Half? (And what does ‘obsolete’ mean: no longer useful, no longer considered true, or no longer at the cutting edge?)

    And where does that nice precise (if rounded to the nearest 5%) figure of 65% come from, re children in primary school being in (at some point in the next 60 years, presumably) in a career that doesn’t exist yet. “A lot”, no doubt. 65% not 55% or 75%?

    Challenges of the age of Twittered statistics.