Column

Triple A: August Acquisition Action

While the US government deals with having less A’s these days it’s been AAA (August Acquisition Action) in the world of legal publishing.

We’re not sure though whether we should adding a plus or minus after those three A’s.

Law Librarians News readers will know that we’ve touched upon this subject in our last two editorials

Usually we see acquisition and deal season in the world of legal publishing happen either post Easter or in September to combine with the Partridge hunting season (Sep 1 – Feb 1) in the UK.

But for reasons we haven’t yet deciphered August 2011 has been littered with press releases from legal publishers telling us who and what they’ve bought or who they are doing deals with.

We’ve also been keeping an eye on the world of legal technology via the Orange Rag blog published by Charles Christian of Legal technology Insider and the story there isn’t dissimilar

A quick listing of headlines on House of Butter reveals the following activity in August

Meanwhile early September has been much quieter than we’d expect.

Here at HOB we don’t have any real explanation or theory on this but we wonder if this is just another illustration that since the 2008 crash and the raft of new players entering the legal content market there is a new dynamic in play that will over the next 2 -3 years fundamentally change the map of the legal publishing and content world.

On a different tack we note that the “Fastcase 50” 2011 has just been published.

The listing details Fastcase’s 50 most influential people in legal information this year. You can see the full list at http://www.fastcase.com/fastcase50/

A quick scan will reveals a vaguely interesting list of individuals with no major surprises except for the fact that we couldn’t find one person on the list who wasn’t North American-based, so we’d like to know why Fastcase couldn’t see beyond their nose on this one.

Why for example have Graham Greenleaf at Austlii and Ruth Bird at the Bodleian Library Oxford not made the list? And why don’t we see one UK, Australian or European legal blogger on the list? Maybe in future they should call it the “North American Fastcase 50.

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