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Archive for ‘Legal Information’

Book Review: The Law Is (Not) for Kids–A Legal Rights Guide for Canadian Children and Teens

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

The Law is (Not) for Kids: A Legal Rights Guide for Canadian Children and Teens. By Ned Lecic & Marvin Zuker. Edmonton, AB: Athabasca University Press, 2019. xiii, 289 p. Includes tables and appendices. ISBN 978-1-77199-237-4 (softcover) $22.99.

Reviewed by Angela Gibson
Bora Laskin Law Library
University of Toronto
In CLLR . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Book Review: Law’s Indigenous Ethics

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Law’s Indigenous Ethics. By John Borrows. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019. vii, 381 p. Includes bibliographic references and index. ISBN 978-1-4875-0491-5 (hardcover) $59.73; ISBN 978-14875-23555-8 (softcover) $39.95; ISBN 978-1-4875-3115-7 (eBook) $39.95.

Reviewed by Mary Hemmings
Law Librarian and Instructor
Faculty of Law, Thompson Rivers University
In CLLR 45:1

John Borrows . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Legal Preparedness for COVID-19

When the SARS outbreak struck Canada (and the world) in 2003 it was not only a lesson in public health preparedness. This tragedy also offered some lessons for those of us in legal.

What were the responsibilities of employers, employees? What was the purview of the state? What responsibilities did Canada have under International Conventions? What about the World Health Organization and the US Center for Disease Control? Who did the public listen to?

As we prepare for COVID-19 it is extremely useful to look at the legal literature that came out a few years post-outbreak. For example, volume 43, . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information

Book Review: Fitness to Plead: International and Comparative Perspectives

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Fitness to Plead: International and Comparative Perspectives. Edited by Ronnie Mackay & Warren Brookbanks. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. xxxi, 323 p. Includes list of contributors and index. ISBN 978-0-19-8788478 (hardcover) $75.00; ISBN 9780191092718 (Kobo) $59.99, (Kindle) $66.27.

Reviewed by Goldwynn Lewis
Law Librarian
Public Prosecution Service of Canada
In . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Legal Information Specialists Twitter Chat Feb 19

“Ask the question.” That was a phrase often heard at morning leadership meetings (AKA coffee with my admin colleagues) at my former law firm. Asking the question was intended to mean that we shouldn’t assume that others in the firm noticed the same problems that we did. It is a call to collaborate, ideate, and create solutions as a team. On February 19 at 1 PM EST the @CALLACBD Executive Board will be asking the question, quite a few questions actually, using a Twitter Chat with the hashtag #CALLACBDCHAT.

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries is using a Twitter . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information: Information Management, Legal Information: Libraries & Research

Alberta Fair Registration Practices of Regulatory Bodies Proclaimed in Force

The Alberta Fair Registration Practices Act is proclaimed in force on March 1, 2020, to speed up the process of newcomers getting their credentials recognized so they can work in the careers they trained for, and remove unfair barriers. . . . [more]

Posted in: Education & Training, Justice Issues, Legal Information, Practice of Law, Practice of Law: Future of Practice, Practice of Law: Practice Management, Substantive Law, Substantive Law: Legislation

Unofficial Consolidated Divorce Act Available

There is, as yet, no official consolidation of the current Divorce Act and Bill C-78 as passed by Parliament, and I understand that one isn’t likely to be coming soon. This isn’t a problem for many, but it is a problem for me and for anyone else who produces public and professional legal education materials.

Since the changes are coming into effect on 1 July 2020, just five short months from the date of writing, I’m taking the opportunity the amendments suggest and rewriting the Clicklaw wikibook JP Boyd on Family Law from stem to stern, and, well, a consolidation . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information, Substantive Law: Legislation

Introducing CanLII’s Latest Research Tools: Decision Highlights and a Powerful New Noteup ✨

We are very excited – and this is a word we don’t use lightly here at CanLII – to present two improvements to the search experience on CanLII.org.

Legal research generally involves (1) understanding what a case is about, and (2) analysing how a case had been considered in subsequent cases.

To help out, we’ve come up with a few features for conducting efficient legal research.

1) Decision highlights and paragraph-level note-ups: A faster way to understand what a case is about.

Decisions are getting longer, at least according to some people (ahem), and this can make it more . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information: Publishing

Book Review: Enforcing Exclusion: Precarious Migrants and the Law in Canada

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Enforcing Exclusion: Precarious Migrants and the Law in Canada. By Sarah Grayce Marsden. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2018. 237 p. Includes bibliographic references and index. ISBN 978-0-7748-3774-3 (softcover) $32.95.

Reviewed by Andrea Black
Dentons Canada LLP, Montreal
In CLLR 44:4

Enforcing Exclusion should be on every immigration lawyer’s bookshelf. It is . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

How to Publish With CanLII

In my last post, I discussed the benefits of publishing with CanLII. Today, I’d like to dive into some of the options on how you can get your work onto the largest legal information resource in Canada. 

Publish With Publishers Who Share Their Content on CanLII

CanLII’s commentary collection has prospered thanks to the incredible group of publishers, law firms, law centres, and other institutions that have partnered with us. A great way to share your work on CanLII is to publish with one these content providers. Check out this Twitter list or browse our commentary collection to learn . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information, Legal Information: Publishing

Book Review: Prosecuting and Defending Offences Against Children–A Practitioner’s Handbook.

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Prosecuting and Defending Offences against Children: A Practitioner’s Handbook. By Lisa Joyal et al. Toronto: Emond, 2019. 573 p. ISBN 978-1-77255-263-8 (softcover) $129.00; ISBN 978-1-77255-264-5 (eBook) $115.00.

Reviewed by Jenny Thornhill, MSC, MLIS, MSL
Law Librarian
Law Society of Newfoundland & Labrador Law Library
In CLLR 44:3

Prosecuting and Defending Offences . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Top Ten Accessed Cases on CanLII From 2019 🌎

I was recently invited to a lunch where we were invited to consider both the end of the year and the end of the decade. This came as a surprise as I hadn’t thought about that simple matter of the two digits turning over this year. Since then, I was reminded that because there was no “zero” year, the end of the decade will actually not be for another year, but we all know that’s not the usual way of counting these things.

The end of the year means that we have reached the time when we like to look . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information