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Archive for ‘Legal Information’

Add Some Education to Your Week

Everyone I connect with from legal is flat out busy. One of the challenges with being flat out busy is that you get so involved doing the tasks in front of you and don’t necessarily consider better ways of doing those tasks. This week and next, the Canadian Association of Law Libraries Virtual Conference Series continues. Cost: $0 Opportunity: $priceless.

Please join us on Friday to celebrate excellence in Legal Publishing! . . . [more]

Posted in: Education & Training: CLE/PD, Legal Information: Information Management

Book Review: Assisted Death: Legal, Social and Ethical Issues After Carter

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Assisted Death: Legal, Social and Ethical Issues after Carter. Edited by Derek B.M. Ross. Toronto: LexisNexis, 2018. xlii, 544 p. Includes table of cases. ISBN 978-0- 433-49868-1 (softcover) $125.00.

Reviewed by Kim Clarke
Director, Bennett Jones Law Library
University of Calgary
In CLLR 45:2

Considering that Carter, 2015 SCC 5, . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Virtual Conference Series for Legal Information Specialists

May is typically the beginning of the season for conferences that law librarians attend, kicking off with the CALL/ACBD conference. This year, we are attending virtually, and you are invited to our events!

You may consider yourself a law librarian, knowledge manager, legal researcher, legal information provider, legal technology developer, legal information specialist or user, or not – it doesn’t matter to us – you are welcome to join in. You may be a member of CALL or a member of a law library sister association, or not – regardless of whether you paid your modest CALL/ACBD membership fee for . . . [more]

Posted in: Education & Training, Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Legal Information: Publishing

KM-as-a-Service

Knowledge management (KM) professionals know that there are several elements that will make or break the success of a KM initiative. One such element is mostly humans: Will the lawyers in your organization actually adopt the industry leading enterprise search system that you are spending big bucks on?

At the same time, anyone who has a close or remote encounter with the law in Canada has CanLII.org open on one or several devices. The site, heavily used by Canadian lawyers, is a good example of a widespread adoption of technology by the legal profession and the judiciary. Also, if you . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information: Information Management, Miscellaneous

Hugh Lawford Award for Excellence in Legal Publishing – Shortlist Announced

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries is delighted to announce the shortlist for the 2020 Hugh Lawford Award for Excellence in Legal Publishing. I am sharing this message on behalf of award committee Chair and Past President of the Association, Ann Marie Melvie.

This award honours Hugh Lawford (1933-2009), Professor of Law at Queens’ University and founder of Quicklaw. It is awarded to a publisher (whether for-profit or not-for profit, corporate or non-corporate) that has demonstrated excellence by publishing a work, series, website, or electronic product that makes a significant contribution to legal research and scholarship.

After reviewing a number

. . . [more]
Posted in: Legal Information: Information Management, Legal Information: Publishing

Legal Libraries Go Digital During Pandemic

While the courts haven’t closed, they’ve certainly slowed down. And if one thing that litigators are used to doing, it’s reading case law.

The Great Library at Law Society of Ontario has announced on Twitter that all licensees can obtain free access to Westlaw and Proview for 30 days. The initiative is intended to support remote workers and promote self-isolation, but us legal geeks will likely use it just to read interesting things.

Digital access to these resources are normally an extension of the services available to licensees through annual fees. LIRN subscribes to publisher collections to make this access . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research

Book Review: Incomprehensible! a Study of How the Legal System Encourages Incomprehensibility, Why It Matters, and What Can Be Done About It

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Incomprehensible!: A Study of How the Legal System Encourages Incomprehensibility, Why It Matters, and What Can Be Done about It. By Wendy Wagner & Will Walker. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2019. xviii, 342 p. Includes bibliography and index. ISBN13 978-1107400887 (paperback) $39.95; ISBN13 978-1107008472 (hardcover) $102.95.

Reviewed by David . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Book Review: The Law Is (Not) for Kids–A Legal Rights Guide for Canadian Children and Teens

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

The Law is (Not) for Kids: A Legal Rights Guide for Canadian Children and Teens. By Ned Lecic & Marvin Zuker. Edmonton, AB: Athabasca University Press, 2019. xiii, 289 p. Includes tables and appendices. ISBN 978-1-77199-237-4 (softcover) $22.99.

Reviewed by Angela Gibson
Bora Laskin Law Library
University of Toronto
In CLLR . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Book Review: Law’s Indigenous Ethics

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Law’s Indigenous Ethics. By John Borrows. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019. vii, 381 p. Includes bibliographic references and index. ISBN 978-1-4875-0491-5 (hardcover) $59.73; ISBN 978-14875-23555-8 (softcover) $39.95; ISBN 978-1-4875-3115-7 (eBook) $39.95.

Reviewed by Mary Hemmings
Law Librarian and Instructor
Faculty of Law, Thompson Rivers University
In CLLR 45:1

John Borrows . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Legal Preparedness for COVID-19

When the SARS outbreak struck Canada (and the world) in 2003 it was not only a lesson in public health preparedness. This tragedy also offered some lessons for those of us in legal.

What were the responsibilities of employers, employees? What was the purview of the state? What responsibilities did Canada have under International Conventions? What about the World Health Organization and the US Center for Disease Control? Who did the public listen to?

As we prepare for COVID-19 it is extremely useful to look at the legal literature that came out a few years post-outbreak. For example, volume 43, . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information

Book Review: Fitness to Plead: International and Comparative Perspectives

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Fitness to Plead: International and Comparative Perspectives. Edited by Ronnie Mackay & Warren Brookbanks. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. xxxi, 323 p. Includes list of contributors and index. ISBN 978-0-19-8788478 (hardcover) $75.00; ISBN 9780191092718 (Kobo) $59.99, (Kindle) $66.27.

Reviewed by Goldwynn Lewis
Law Librarian
Public Prosecution Service of Canada
In . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Legal Information Specialists Twitter Chat Feb 19

“Ask the question.” That was a phrase often heard at morning leadership meetings (AKA coffee with my admin colleagues) at my former law firm. Asking the question was intended to mean that we shouldn’t assume that others in the firm noticed the same problems that we did. It is a call to collaborate, ideate, and create solutions as a team. On February 19 at 1 PM EST the @CALLACBD Executive Board will be asking the question, quite a few questions actually, using a Twitter Chat with the hashtag #CALLACBDCHAT.

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries is using a Twitter . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information: Information Management, Legal Information: Libraries & Research