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Archive for ‘Legal Information’

Book Review: Feminist Judgments in International Law

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Feminist Judgments in International Law. Edited by Loveday Hodson & Troy Lavers. Oxford, UK: Hart Publishing, 2019. xix, 511 p. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-1-50991-445-6 (hardcover) £90.00; ISBN 978-1-50991-443-2 (eBook) £64.80.

Reviewed by Dominique Garingan
Library Manager, Calgary
Parlee McLaws LLP
In CLLR 45:4

In Feminist Judgments in . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Book Review: Bankruptcy Law Picture Book–A Brief Intro to the Law of Bankruptcy, in Pictures

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Bankruptcy Law Picture Book: A Brief Intro to the Law of Bankruptcy, in Pictures. By Wela Quan. Toronto: Irwin Law, 2019. 178 p. Includes illustrations. ISBN 978-1-55221-519-7 (softcover) $30.00; ISBN 978-1-55221-520-3 (eBook) $30.00.

Reviewed by Krisandra Ivings
Reference Librarian
Supreme Court of Canada
In CLLR 45:4

Wela Quan’s Bankruptcy Law Picture . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Seeking Nominations for the 2021 Hugh Lawford Award for Excellence in Legal Publishing

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries has long had an annual award for excellent legal publishing. Some years ago, we renamed the award we present after Queens University Professor Hugh Lawford (1933-2009) to recognize his contributions to legal publishing in Canada. As a group of legal information specialists, our work depends on being able to access and share high-quality legal knowledge. We value innovation and the award is open to all information formats. Slaw.ca was recognized with this award in 2009.

The CALL/ACBD is accepting nominations for the 2021 Hugh Lawford Award for Excellence in Legal Publishing.

This award . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information: Publishing

Cheifetz, Apportionment of Fault (1981) – PDF Available

Apportionment of Fault In Tort (1981) – David Cheifetz

An unrestricted PDF of Cheifetz, Apportionment of Fault in Tort is now available. The text has been out of print for about 2 decades.

The “price”, for Canadian purchasers, will be a donation of CDN $20 to either the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children or the Vancouver Children’s Hospital. Purchasers from other countries should chose a suitable children’s hospital or equivalent in their jurisdictions.

If you want the PDF: Send a request to me at dcheifetz21@gmail.com with a copy of the donation confirmation and the email address to which you want . . . [more]

Posted in: Announcements, Legal Information, Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Miscellaneous, Practice of Law, Practice of Law: Practice Management, Substantive Law, Substantive Law: Judicial Decisions, Substantive Law: Legislation

Book Review: Commissions of Inquiry

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Commissions of Inquiry. By Hon. Stephen Goudge & Heather MacIvor. Toronto: LexisNexis, 2019. xvi, 510 p. Includes appendices and index. ISBN 9780433503118 (softcover) $120.00. Reviewed by Paul F. McKenna Lecturer, School of Information Management Dalhousie University In CLLR 45:3 This comprehensive work deals with all things related to the concept, characteristics, . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

Book Review: A Reconciliation Without Recollection? an Investigation of the Foundations of Aboriginal Law in Canada

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

A Reconciliation without Recollection? An Investigation of the Foundations of Aboriginal Law in Canada. By Joshua Ben David Nichols. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2020. xxx, 376 p. Includes bibliography and index. ISBN 978-1-4875-2187-5 (paper) $49.95; ISBN 978-1-4875-0225- 6 (cloth) $125.00; ISBN 978-1-4875-1498-3 (ePub) $49.95; ISBN 978-1-4875-1497-6 (PDF) $49.95. Reviewed by . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews

States of Emergency: The Inequity of Municipal Governance During the Pandemic

Since the onset of the pandemic in March of this year, municipalities across the country have instituted policies and by-laws that have had a serious impact on residents, often not following regular processes. The University of Windsor Faculty of Law Centre for Cities has recently released its report about municipal states of emergency, States of Emergency (“the Report”), co-authored by Dr. Anneke Smit (Director, Centre for Cities) and students Hana Syed, Aucha Stewart, Terra Duchene, and Michael Fazzari, which analyses the response of municipalities across Canada in the early days of the pandemic and proposes a way forward, not only . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews, Reading: Recommended, Substantive Law

Researching the Use of Emojis in the Legal Profession

Emojis are everywhere. They have become so popular that in 2015 the Oxford Dictionary chose 😂as the word of the year. Their conspicuous usage has already become present in our legal systems. ☺in Canada, 🔫in France, 👍in Spain, 💃🏻👯‍✌️☄️🐿️in Israel, ✈️in New Zealand or 🤐in Australia are just of the few noteworthy examples of the new frontiers of cases involving emojis. Professor Eric Goldman at the Santa Clara University School of Law has aimed to compile a list of cases in the United States where emojis as well as emoticons[1] have been used in courts. . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information

Introducing Legal Listening: A Brave New World of Legal Audio & Commentary

As we embrace technology in our courtrooms, meetings, and classrooms, it is time we do the same with delivery of legal information. The law’s track record on disability within the profession is mixed, at best. While some universities and employers have an excellent track record with students and lawyers with disabilities or learning difficulties, others do not. Law, and wider society, also tend to ignore less visible or invisible disabilities. Those among us who have difficulty with traditional learning methods often struggle with the barriers created by traditional learning. There is a gap in access to legal information for people . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information, Legal Information: Publishing

Law Reform Commission of Ireland Report on Accessibility of Legislation in the Digital Age

Law reform commission reports can be great sources for legal research. Many of the reports provide historical background and you can often find comparative information about how different jurisdictions have responded to an issue. Case in point: The Law Reform Commission of Ireland last week released a report on the Accessibility of Legislation in the Digital Age that makes a wide range of recommendations as to how legislation can be made available online in a more consolidated and comprehensive way. Chapter 3 of the report, “Comparative Approaches to Making Legislation Accessible”, considers, from an historical perspective, legislative developments that have . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Substantive Law: Foreign Law, Substantive Law: Legislation

Law via the Internet 2020

I might have titled this post “pandemic pleasures” or some other alliterative title that made it clear that ONLY in 2020 would some opportunities be available. This year I had the benefit and pleasure of attending a conference that I have longed to go to – Law Via the Internet. LVI 2020 was originally intended to be in the UK. The conference is almost always overseas. Slawyers know that in-person conferences and travelling are not possible. Slawyers should also know by now that many, many things are now feasible like attending a global conference of interest but perceived as not . . . [more]

Posted in: Education & Training: CLE/PD, Justice Issues, Legal Information: Publishing

Book Review: Criminal Law and the Man Problem

Several times each month, we are pleased to republish a recent book review from the Canadian Law Library Review (CLLR). CLLR is the official journal of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL/ACBD), and its reviews cover both practice-oriented and academic publications related to the law.

Criminal Law and the Man Problem. By Ngaire Naffine. Oxford: Hart, 2019. xiii, 205 p. Includes bibliographic references and index. ISBN 978-1-50991-801-0 (hardcover) £38.50; ISBN 978-1-50991-802-7 (ePub) £41.58; ISBN 978-1-50991-803-4 (ePDF) £41.58. Reviewed by Ken Fox Reference Librarian Law Society of Saskatchewan Library In CLLR 45:3 What is the “man” . . . [more]

Posted in: Book Reviews