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Archive for ‘Legal Information: Libraries & Research’

KF Modified: A Law Classification for the Small American Law Library?*

In the June issue of Technical Services Law Librarian Karen Wahl talks about Kristen M. Hallows‘ article called “It’s All Enumerative: Reconsidering Library of Congress Classification in U.S. Law Libraries” published in the Winter issue of the Law Library Journal.

In her review Wahl says:

The major thesis is that a subject classification scheme, rather than a jurisdictional classification scheme, may better support the needs of users because it will collocate related materials better, leading to better browsability for the patrons. It implies that the hyper-specificity of LCC makes this more difficult for a smaller law

. . . [more]
Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research

#SLAtalk Tomorrow: Trailblazing! Info Pros and the Entrepreneurial Spirit

SLA has had a regular series of Twitter chats on a variety of topics. The next one, on info pros and entrepreneurialism, is close to my heart, and being co-hosted by another association I belong to, AIIP (Association of Independent Information Professionals). Details below. I hope you will take part or read along.

#SLAtalk: Trailblazing! Info Pros and the Entrepreneurial Spirit
https://www.sla.org/slatalk-trailblazing-info-pros-entrepreneurial-spirit/

Passion. Positivity. Adaptability. Leadership. Ambition.

According to Entrepreneur Magazine, it is these five traits that exemplify the entrepreneurial spirit. Join @SLAhq and the Association of Independent Information Professionals (@AIIP) for an hour-long Twitter chat about

. . . [more]
Posted in: Legal Information: Information Management, Legal Information: Libraries & Research

Language of Law

Earlier this week I participated in a bilingual (French–English) conference. Of course, not all participants and presenters were bilingual, so simultaneous interpretation services were offered.

I’m always impressed with simultaneous interpretation. I think it’s a real feat to be able to listen in one language and process the information quickly enough to speak words of the same meaning in another language, while continuing to listen, continuing to process, and continuing to speak. I’m imagining reading a case while dictating a memo while running on a treadmill.

So simultaneous interpretation is wonderful and impressive. What also struck me, though, is that . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information, Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Miscellaneous

Data Curator or What Is in a Name

First, let me say that I am not looking for a job. I have a fantastic, challenging and new job for my employer that is keeping me alert and happy, thank you very much. Now that is out of the way, let me share a job advertisement that landed in my inbox.

Posting Details
Job Work Location:US
Position Title:
Data Curator
Compensation Grade:Band 52T
Posting Date:07-28-2014
Posting Number:20096847
SupOrg – Division Equivalent:US1016 – CUSP
FT/PT: FT
Unit Specific Text:

Position Summary:
The Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP) at New York University seeks a

. . . [more]
Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research

LC’s “Super Secret Decoder Ring” and the Indigenous Law Portal

Tina Gheen, Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Library of Congress, blogged about the Indigenous Law Portal introduced as part of the “A Dialog for Catalogers and Reference Librarians: Class K from Alpha to Omega” program at the recent American Association of Law Libraries annual meeting in San Antonio. Gheen, Jennifer Gonzalez, and Jolande Goldberg spoke about this new online resource “created to make tribal law more accessible and findable by providing a comprehensive listing of tribes, tribal websites, and online primary source materials.”

The Portal uses the structure of the new Library of Congress Classification . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research

Do You Analyze Win-Loss?

A post on the Strategic Librarians LinkedIn Group led me to the Cooperative Intelligence blog where Ellen Naylor (CEO of The Business Intelligence Source, Inc.) posted about templates for win loss analysis.

As more and more legal work filters to law firms through procurement groups, RFPs, and RFIs, I wonder about the use of sales methods in law firms. As a librarian, I worked with legal information suppliers selling information to my organization. I also sold the services of the library department to my internal clients. In my new role of process improvement, I will likely use techniques . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Practice of Law: Marketing

Summaries of Canadian Association of Law Libraries 2014 Conference Sessions

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) has just published summaries of many of the sessions at its most recent annual conference held in late May in Winnipeg. Here are a few of the sessions for which CALL has prepared summaries (the list is not exhaustive):

  • Legal research instruction: a whole new classroom, Eunice Friesen, University of Manitoba (May 26, 2014)
  • Mysteries of government information revealed, Erica Anderson (Ontario Legislative Library), Susan Barker (University of Toronto Bora Laskin Law Library) and Wendy Reynolds (Ontario Legislative Library) (May 26, 2014)
  • Notes from the road to access to justice,
. . . [more]
Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research

Law Reform Commission Reports: Recent Releases

Legal researchers too often overlook law reform commission reports as sources of vital information and analysis.

Law commissions consult widely with stakeholders, sometimes compare how other jurisdictions have dealt with the same problem and they frequently dig into the history of an issue.

Here are a few reports released in the past few weeks.

  • British Columbia Law Institute Report Proposes Franchise Act : The report recommends that British Columbia become the 6th Canadian province to adopt franchise legislation. The report analyzes franchise legislation in force in Canada, the U.S., and elsewhere, and contains a detailed legislative proposal with commentary. Alberta,
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Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Substantive Law: Foreign Law

More Comparative Law Reports From D.C. and Down Under

This is a follow-up to last week’s Slaw.ca post Law Library of Congress Report on Restrictions on Genetically Modified Organisms.

The Law Library of Congress has recently released two other comparative law reports. They are:

  • Child Restraint and Seat Belt Regulations: “This report contains citations to the laws on seat belt use in Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Brazil, Canada, China, Cyprus, Egypt, England and Wales, Fiji, Ghana, Indonesia, Kiribati, Malta, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Oman, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, and Vietnam, with information on provisions concerning children where available.”
. . . [more]
Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Substantive Law: Foreign Law

CALL-L Listserv and Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries List (CALL-L) is an e-mail discussion list fostering an interest in and discussion on law librarianship in Canada. A message went out today from CALL-L list owner/manager Susan Jones at the University of New Brunswick to all subscribers asking us to “opt in” to being on the list.

This measure is being taken to comply with Canada’s new anti-spam legislation coming into force on July 1st. While the list itself is not a commercial vehicle, some of the messages posted may be interpreted as such. From the message to subscribers:

CALL-L is used by

. . . [more]
Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Technology: Internet

Law Library of Congress Report on Restrictions on Genetically Modified Organisms

The Law Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. has published a new comparative law report on Restrictions on Genetically Modified Organisms.

The report analyzes legislation on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and genetically modified (GM) plants and foods in Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, England and Wales, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, the Russian Federation, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, and the United States.

There is also a bibliography.

Earlier comparative law reports from the Law Library of Congress have covered topics such as:

. . . [more]
Posted in: Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Substantive Law: Foreign Law