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CIA Discovers Wikipedia

Well, seems like someone did not tell staffers at the CIA that Wikipedia has become more vigilant in monitoring ‘who changes what’ on the online encyclopedia. A sidebar story “Look Who’s Using Wiki To Rewrite History” from Capital Insider (Business Week, March 13, 2006, p. 49, By Richard S. Dunham) reports as follows:

“… What does the CIA have against Bill Clinton? In the latest episode of virtual vandalism by federal employees, CIA staffers have been caught altering entries in Wikipedia, an online encyclopedia that can be edited by anyone with an Internet connection. Someone using

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Posted in: Miscellaneous

March Is Fraud Prevention Month

Is it just me, or does there seem to be an increase in fraudulent activities these days? I have seen increased evidence of activities such as phishing, spoofing, faux lottery schemes, and calls asking for renewals of directories never previously purchased, as well as the ever popular grabbing of company logos from websites and using them on letters to defraud people out of money in their bank accounts.

And as if phishing weren’t enough, there is something even more targeted called “spear phishing“:

How spear phishing scams work
Spear phishing describes any highly targeted phishing attack. Spear phishers

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Posted in: Miscellaneous

ArchiveGrid

ArchiveGrid is an important destination for searching through historical documents, personal papers, and family histories held in archives around the world.Thousands of libraries, museums, and archives have contributed nearly a million collection descriptions to ArchiveGrid. Researchers searching ArchiveGrid can learn about the many items in each of these collections, contact archives to arrange a visit to examine materials, and order copies.ArchiveGrid is available to both individuals and institutions free of charge through May 31st.
Posted in: Miscellaneous

The Friday Fillip

Like many people with a yen for systematizing, I like diagrams. When I think a problem out I doodle and draw lines to boxes, circle words, do double underscores and the like. When I assemble something from, well, you know where, I look at the pictures and almost never read the instructions.

So I’m mightily impressed when someone can represent a complex situation with a clear picture. My hero in this regard is Edward Tufte, whose three last books — 1983: The Visual Display of Quantitative Information (pictures of numbers). ISBN 096139210X; 1990: Envisioning Information (pictures of nouns). ISBN . . . [more]

Posted in: Miscellaneous

John Davis

Please welcome our newest occasional contributor, Professor John Davis, from Osgoode Hall Law School. John, as most all of you will know, has been law librarian at the University of Victoria and at Osgoode. It’s a great pleasure to have John with us and I look forward to his contributions, occasional though they may be.

In fact, I think I see one coming up in a matter of moments. . . . [more]

Posted in: Miscellaneous

Requests for Legal Seminar Publishers

I have observed a lot of frustration lately from various quarters regarding legal seminar providers. While my comments below are directed primarily at commercial seminar providers, these comments may prove useful to other organizations who put on legal seminars. These are changes I, and many others, would like to see:

  • Customer service, customer service, customer service! That means answering your phones, returning calls, and responding to email in a timely fashion. Customer service staff should be knowledgable about the seminars you hold, past and upcoming, and the products you sell. I know seminars are always in great demand, but alienating
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Posted in: Miscellaneous

Origami – Has the Future Arrived?

Blogs have been abuzz for the last few weeks with one of the worse kept secrets in the technology business — the new Microsoft Origami mini-note computer. Launched at CeBIT Technology Conference in Germany, March 9th, this sub notebook computer creates a newly named category of computers — Ultra-Mobile Personal Computers (UMPCs). [See the Microsoft site for official details] By the way, didn’t anyone tell them this doesn’t conform to the need for a Three Letter Acronym or TLA?

Anyway, heres the skinny on this new device. eWeek reports that:

“The new devices are expected to weigh in at

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Posted in: Miscellaneous