Canada’s online legal magazine.

Research Program on Digital Evidence

The British Institute of International and Comparative Law fosters a number of research initiative, of which the Digital Evidence Research Programme is one, with the broad aim of researching:

the practical and legal issues that accompany the inclusion of digital evidence into judicial proceedings. The IT industry provides products on a global scale, and IT has now become ubiquitous. Information technology affects us all, even though we may not appreciate how it affects our daily lives. It also affects human relationships, and in turn, documents created by IT systems are the subject of evidence in legal proceedings.

The IT industry

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Posted in: Miscellaneous

University of Minnesota Human Rights Library

Under the aegis of the University of Minnesota Human Rights Center, the University of Minnesota Human Rights Library:

houses…more than twenty-three thousand core human rights documents, including several hundred human rights treaties and other primary international human rights instruments. The site also provides access to more than four thousands links and a unique search device for multiple human rights sites. This comprehensive research tool is accessed by more than a 175,000 students, scholars, educators, and human rights advocates monthly from over 135 countries around the world. Documents are available in six languages – Arabic, English, French, Japanese, Russian,

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Posted in: Miscellaneous

BlawgWorld 2006

BlawgWorld 2006 is a 112 page PDF report now available without registering for Technolawyer. This report profiling 52 law blogs came out in November 2005, and our own Steve Matthews’ blog Vancouver Law Librarian Blog is included. This report is a snapshot of some “best of” blog posts.

Thanks to a recent post from Jim Calloway’s Law Practice Tips Blog for pointing this out. . . . [more]

Posted in: Miscellaneous

Grazr

Grazr is a product/service that lets you make an OPML file operational — which may not tell you very much. OPML stands for outline processor markup language, and it’s essentially a dialect of XML that, when opened in a sympathetic outliner program, displays your outline with collapse and expand functionality.

One of the main things it’s used for currently is the export and exchange of your RSS subscriptions. Feed readers “eat” (or should) OPML files, so I could bundle up all of my feed subscriptions and ship them to Steve or Connie or you, and you could plug them into . . . [more]

Posted in: Miscellaneous

Check Up From the Neck Up

Our mental health is something we often neglect or try to ignore, despite increasing risks in our stressful modern lives. A pilot project spearheaded by the Mood Disorders Association of Ontario and a number of other health organizations is looking to increase awareness about our mental health with their website Check Up from the Neck Up, launched today.

The website features a diagnostic questionnaire which “funnels” the participant into additional questions to investigate possible areas of concern. The questionnaire was developed by the Department of Psychiatry at Sunnybrook and Women’s Health Sciences Centre which, incidentally, have divided as of . . . [more]

Posted in: Miscellaneous

Google Related Links

I posted recently about Y!Q, Yahoo’s “contextual search.” Well now there’s Google Related Links:

Google Related Links use the power of Google to automatically bring fresh, dynamic and interesting content links to any website. Webmasters can place these units on their site to provide visitors with links to useful information related to the site’s content, including relevant news, searches, and pages.

The idea’s the same: if you put the service on your site, certain words on your site will be accompanied by a small icon which leads to a set of links that are (one hopes) relevant to the . . . [more]

Posted in: Miscellaneous

HigherEd BlogCon 2006

HigherEd BlogCon is a free online conference taking place from 3rd to 28 Apil with article, podcasts, and screencasts from presenters at 30 colleges and universities worldwide on the topic of “transformation academic communities with new tools of the social web.

There are 4 sessions: teaching; library and information resources; admissions, alumni relatinos, and communications & marketing; websites and webdevelopment.

It also has an RSS feed. . . . [more]

Posted in: Miscellaneous

Graphical Statutes

Fast after Westlaw’s new interface, developments on the statutory research front.

You have until Friday to experimentThe website claims that the service is free until April 7, but regular access to content charges will still apply. with a new way of organizing the legislative evolution of statutes: West has announced a Graphical Statutes service.

Graphical Statutes illustrates the evolution of a statute. It presents the big picture in an easy-to-read display that incorporates prior, current and future versions of a statute. Users can track changes in the law, as well as locate relevant legislative history materials for

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Posted in: Miscellaneous

Commonwealth Case Law Portal Launched

According to today’s Star – that’s the Malaysian version – MyLawBox has launched

the first case law portal for Commonwealth nations. The portal is targeted at law firms, local and international businesses, law schools and their students, and covers countries often overlooked by such initiatives. The 11 countries whose laws and cases are covered at the website are Malaysia, Brunei, South Africa, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Hong Kong, Britain, Australia, Canada and New Zealand. The website offers trial cases, legislation and articles on the law from these countries.

Users will also be able to look up previous

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Posted in: Miscellaneous

Parliament Resumed Today

Parliament resumed today, and Liberal MP for Kingston, Peter Milliken, was re-elected Speaker. From this afternoon’s CBC write-up:

It’s significant that all three candidates were Liberals. Speakers can only cast a vote when there is a tie in Parliament.

As a result, it’s not unusual for a minority government, which needs the vote of every one of its MPs, to ask that only members of the Opposition put their names forward for Speaker.

Meanwhile, constituents of MP David Emerson, who crossed the floor after the elections to become Cabinet Minister in the newly formed Harper government, were protesting:

Elsewhere,

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Posted in: Miscellaneous