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A New Legal Citation Guide for Canada on the Horizon / Vers Un Nouveau Guide Canadien De Citation Juridique

(La version française suite)

A New Legal Citation Guide for Canada on the Horizon

A group of interested individuals has come together to address the challenge of uniform legal citation in Canada.

There is currently no standard legal citation guide in Canada that has been uniformly accepted by all legal sectors and institutions. In addition to existing published citation guides, various courts, law schools, law journals and publishers have developed and are using their own guides to meet their particular needs.

The Canadian public has a right to an accessible standard of legal citation that will facilitate, not hinder their . . . [more]

Posted in: Announcements, Firm Guest Blogger, Legal Information, Legal Information: Libraries & Research

Summaries Sunday: Supreme Advocacy

On one Sunday each month we bring you a summary from Supreme Advocacy LLP of recent decisions at the Supreme Court of Canada. Supreme Advocacy LLP offers a weekly electronic newsletter, Supreme Advocacy Letter, to which you may subscribe. It’s a summary of all appeals and leaves to appeal granted, so you know what the S.C.C. will soon be dealing with (April 14 – May 11, 2016 inclusive).

Appeals

Aboriginal Law: Métis & Non-Status Indians
Daniels v. Canada (Indian Affairs and Northern Development), 2016 SCC 12 (35945)

Non-status Indians and Métis are “Indians” under s. 91(24) and can turn . . . [more]

Posted in: Summaries Sunday

Summaries Sunday: SOQUIJ

Every week we present the summary of a decision handed down by a Québec court provided to us by SOQUIJ and considered to be of interest to our readers throughout Canada. SOQUIJ is attached to the Québec Department of Justice and collects, analyzes, enriches, and disseminates legal information in Québec.

PÉNAL (DROIT) : Reconnu coupable d’avoir omis de déclarer l’exportation d’une somme de 17 270 $, soit l’infraction prévue à l’article 74 (1) a) de la Loi sur le recyclage des produits de la criminalité et le financement des activités terroristes, l’accusé est condamné à payer une amende de . . . [more]

Posted in: Summaries Sunday

Imposing Quotas on the Legal Profession

Perhaps it didn’t make as many waves in the rest of the country, but the Quebec legal community has been buzzing about a report on the employment situation among young lawyers in Quebec published by the Young Bar Association of Montreal (YBAM) earlier this year. This organization, which represents close to 5,000 members, compiled impressive amounts of data to establish trends about young lawyers’ job prospects.

Essentially, things are bad for young lawyers in Montreal and they are getting worse. The issue has now made its way into mainstream media, with La Presse running a few articles last week about . . . [more]

Posted in: Practice of Law

Justice Needs and Satisfaction in Ukraine and Uganda

What do Ukraine and Uganda have in common, besides the U at the beginning of their name? An elaborate justice needs and satisfaction survey was just done in both countries. The Ukraine results were presented on 1 March. The Uganda results on 14 April.

First, some observations to put this in a wider context.

I hope such surveys are a trend. They should be. The UN has announced that it will hold its first ministerial meeting in July to review progress regarding implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We are, of course, mostly interested in Justice Goal 16. . . . [more]

Posted in: Practice of Law

Thursday Thinkpiece: Hall-Coates on Digital Media and the Open Court Principle

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

Following Digital Media into the Courtroom: Publicity and the Open Court Principle in the Information Age
(2015) 24 Dalhousie Journal of Legal Studies 101

Shauna Hall-Coates
Shauna Hall-Coates completed a combined JD/MLIS from Dalhousie University in 2015, and will be called to the Nova Scotia Bar in June 2016.

Excerpt: Abstract, Introduction, and . . . [more]

Posted in: Thursday Thinkpiece

Spring Update From Washington, DC

No, I am not going to comment on the amazing circus our U.S. presidential election has become. I want to bring you up to date on the Law Library of Congress’s latest news and their continuing progress in providing free U.S. government information to the world.

David Mao, former Law Librarian of Congress, is still the Acting Librarian of Congress. But Carla Hayden, CEO of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore Maryland, has been nominated by President Barack Obama to become the first African American and first woman to hold this position. I hope that the U.S. Senate will . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Information

A National Code of Conduct?

I like the Federation of Law Societies’ Model Code of Conduct. It’s not perfect. But it represents the culmination of considerable effort and reflection by intelligent and thoughtful lawyers. It provides meaningful guidance on a number of issues that lawyers face, particularly in relation to conflicts of interest. It provides a vehicle for national discussion and for work on emerging issues and on areas requiring reform. The Federation has done some truly great things with the Code, such as having a Standing Committee to update and revise the Code on an ongoing basis, and creating an interactive website . . . [more]

Posted in: Legal Ethics

Wednesday: What’s Hot on CanLII

Each Wednesday we tell you which three English-language cases and which French-language case have been the most viewed* on CanLII and we give you a small sense of what the cases are about.

For this last week:

1. Malton v Attia, 2016 ABCA 130

[83] In this case, the numerous unjustified criticisms of and adverse findings against the appellants and their counsel, already discussed in these reasons, raise a concern that the trial judge was predisposed against the appellants. Taken individually, the various adverse findings and criticisms would not be able to withstand appellate review, but they would not . . . [more]

Posted in: Wednesday: What's Hot on CanLII

Disaggregation of Legal Information

Disaggregate verb. used without object. Meaning: to separate into component parts. Synonyms: ventilate, distill, itemize, breakdown, subdivide.

An April 25 press release from ICLR (The Incorporated Council of Law Reporting for England and Wales) reported:

[ICLR] has started the process of disaggregating its law reports from the online services operated by LexisNexis and Thomson Reuters in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. Subscribers to these services based elsewhere in the world will not be affected. The process of removing ICLR content from these providers will take effect on 1 January 2017. Thereafter, the ICLR – the publisher of

. . . [more]
Posted in: Legal Information: Publishing

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on research and writing, practice, and technology.

Research & Writing

Subscribe to Government & Court Press Releases
Bronwyn Guiton

Press releases are a good source of free current awareness alerts and a legitimate resource for understanding the intent of new legislation. I’m sharing a few of my favourite sources for timely and helpful press releases today. I’m a BC law librarian so I use these three sources often. Please share your own favourite sources for . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

“As Smooth as a Grape”: Style in Decision Writing

Everything that can be thought at all can be thought clearly. Everything that can be said can be said clearly.

Ludwig Wittgenstein

Have something to say, and say it as clearly as you can. That is the only secret of style.

Matthew Arnold

Decision makers have to focus on the substance of the dispute before them and do the important and sometimes difficult work of coming to the right decision. But after that, it remains for them to write the decision clearly and concisely. This is where style in writing takes on such a critical role. If the people reading . . . [more]

Posted in: Dispute Resolution