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Archive for ‘Tips Tuesday’ Feature

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

Changes
Neil Guthrie

The meanings of words change over time. A nice example is condescending, which not so long ago meant something along the lines of ‘being gracious to the underlings’ (the King James Bible, Dr Johnson and Lord Byron use it in this sense). Since the later nineteenth century, it has meant ‘patronising’ (in a bad way; that also once had a neutral or even . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

Are You Doing Your Utmost or Your Upmost?
Neil Guthrie

To do one’s utmost is to make the maximum possible effort: We will do our utmost to meet the deadline imposed by the regulator. What one sometimes sees (or, more often, hears) is upmost instead of utmost. Close, but no cigar. … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

Miscellaneous Mistakes
Neil Guthrie

Some random things I’ve seen and heard lately. Don’t take it personal: Nope. Personally is how one should (or should not) take it. You would make it personal, however, because you want an adjective to modify it (not the adverb that needs to modify take). … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

Thoughts on the Oxford Comma
Neil Guthrie

When people hear I’ve published a book on writing, many of them ask for my views on the ‘Oxford’ or “serial’ comma, in that intense ‘please confirm my own view’ sort of way. The Oxford comma, so called because the University Press has long insisted on it, is used in lists: A, B, and C. Whether one needs the . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

How Do You Note Up a Specific Paragraph of a Case?
Susannah Tredwell

There are a couple of ways of noting up a specific paragraph of a case, with the easiest option being on CanLII. For CanLII, start off by searching for the case you are interested in. … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

Unnecessary Legalese, Mostly Archaic
Neil Guthrie

Commence: This word is unavoidable as a technical term in litigation: one commences an action under the Courts of Justice Act, RSO 1990, c C43, for example. But don’t use the word in normal parlance or non-technical writing, where it sounds fussy and pompous. … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

Redundancies Galore
Neil Guthrie

All of these seen recently. Action plan: I suppose there could be a plan to do nothing (an inaction plan?), but generally plan implies taking action — so the first element inaction plan is redundant. … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

There Are Some Hard to Find Foreign Cases on CanLII
Susannah Tredwell

One of CANLII’s lesser known resources is its Foreign reported decisions database which “includes some decisions issued by foreign courts and tribunals and that are of special interest for Canadian law.” … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

Unnecessary Lawyerisms
Neil Guthrie

These aren’t always confined to lawyers; they permeate the e-mail and speech of law clerks, legal assistants and students. Advised: The phrase Please be advised that … has to be one of the most leaden openings of all time. Cut to the chase and just convey the actual information, without the pointless preamble. … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

Miscellaneous Jargon
Neil Guthrie

We’ve had lots on bad business jargon in this space, but other fields of endeavour have also been polluting the language. Surface: This is from the world of technology, a jargon-generator if ever there was one. … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

Key Takeaways
Neil Guthrie

This was cited in Guthrie’s Guide as an example of bad business jargon, without much additional commentary. Because of its ubiquity, this dreadful phrase merits a few words. … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday

Tips Tuesday

Here are excerpts from the most recent tips on SlawTips, the site that each week offers up useful advice, short and to the point, on practice, research, writing and technology.

Research & Writing

A New Resource for Translations of Canadian Case Law
Susannah Tredwell

The Centre de traduction et de terminologie juridiques (CTTJ) at the Université de Moncton has been working on a project to translate important unilingual Canadian court decisions into Canada’s other official language. … . . . [more]

Posted in: Tips Tuesday