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Archive for ‘Thursday Thinkpiece’ Feature

Thursday Thinkpiece: Sankoff Decodes the Duffy Trial

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

The Worst $90,000 Ever Spent: Ten Questions About Mike Duffy, Nigel Wright, the Criminal Code and the Canadian Criminal Justice System
Peter Sankoff, Professor, University of Alberta Faculty of Law

Excerpt: Introduction and points 1-4. To read the paper in its entirety, please click on the title above to download from SSRN. . . . [more]

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Thursday Thinkpiece: Simmons on What Zombies Can Teach Law Students

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

What Zombies Can Teach Law Students: Popular Text Inclusion in Law and Literature

Thomas E. Simmons
66 Mercer Law Review 729 (2015)

Excerpt: Introduction and pp 744-753

[Footnotes omitted. They can be found in the original via the link above]

I. INTRODUCTION

The recent spike in tales about zombies has generated inspired responses . . . [more]

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Thursday Thinkpiece: Zaidi on Jobs in the Canadian Legal Marketplace

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

Jobs in the Canadian Legal Marketplace: A Resource for Students and Professionals

By Kamaal Zaidi © 2015 Friesen Press. Reprinted with permission.

Excerpts from the Introduction and Chapters 1-2, 4-6

Introduction

Are you looking for a job in the legal profession? This book will help you achieve your goal if you have recently . . . [more]

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Thursday Thinkpiece: Cheung on Search Engine Liability in the Autocomplete Era

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

Defaming by Suggestion: Searching for Search Engine Liability in the Autocomplete Era

By Anne S.Y. Cheung, Associate Professor, The University of Hong Kong – Faculty of Law, in “Comparative Perspectives on the Fundamentals of Freedom of Expression” (Andras Koltay, ed.), forthcoming.

Excerpt: pp 1-14

[Footnotes omitted. They can be found . . . [more]

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Thursday Thinkpiece: Bakht and Palmer on Witchcraft Charges and Constitutionality

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

Modern Law, Modern Hammers: Canada’s Witchcraft Provision as an Image of Persecution

Natasha Bakht, Associate Professor, University of Ottawa Faculty of Law and Jordan Palmer, PhD Candidate, University of Ottawa Faculty of Law
(2015) 35 Windsor Review of Legal and Social Issues 123

Excerpt: pp 123-125, 131-143

[Footnotes omitted. They can . . . [more]

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Thursday Thinkpiece: Skolnik on Calls to Counsel and Constitutional Rights

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

Why There Should Be No Constitutional Right to Contact Counsel from a Police Car
Originally published in the Western Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 5 [2015], Iss. 4, Art. 5

Terry Skolnik, LLL (UOttawa), LLM (Cambridge), SJD candidate (University of Toronto)

Excerpt: Introduction, Part III & IV

[Footnotes omitted. They can be found . . . [more]

Posted in: Thursday Thinkpiece

Thursday Thinkpiece: Carsley on Rethinking Canadian Legal Responses to Frozen Embryo Disputes

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

Rethinking Canadian Legal Responses to Frozen Embryo Disputes

Stefanie Carsley
Canadian Journal of Family Law issue #29(1)
Copyright © 2015 Reprinted with permission from The Canadian Journal of Family Law

Excerpt: Introduction and Part I
[Footnotes omitted. They can be found in the original via the link above]

INTRODUCTION

In December 2012, the . . . [more]

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Thursday Thinkpiece: Kaufman on the Public’s Right to Access Academic Libraries

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

A Different Question of Open Access: Is There a Public Access Right to Academic Libraries in the United States and Canada?

Amy Kaufman, Head of William R. Lederman Law Library, Queen’s University, and co-author of the newly published Out of Practice: Exploring Legal Careers Paths in Canada

Law Library Journal, Vol. 103:3, . . . [more]

Posted in: Thursday Thinkpiece

Thursday Thinkpiece: Webber on Evolution in Constitutional Law

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

The Constitution of Canada: A Contextual Analysis

by Jeremy Webber © 2015 Hart Publishing. Reprinted with permission.

Author’s note: This excerpt comes from the very end of the book: pages 262 to 265. One of the book’s central themes is that any constitutional order is a work in progress, constantly being created . . . [more]

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Thursday Thinkpiece: Chatterjee on Anonymity and De-Identifying Family Case Law

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

Balancing Privacy and the Open Court Principle of Family Law: Does De-Identifying Case Law Protect Anonymity?

Sujoy Chatterjee
Dalhousie Journal of Legal Studies, Volume 23 (2014)

Excerpt: pp 97-103

[Footnotes omitted. They can be found in the original via the link above]

Analyzing the Open Court Principle

The open court principle is a . . . [more]

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Thursday Thinkpiece: Kimbro on Gamification for Law Firms

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

Gamification for Law Firms

Stephanie L. Kimbro, Fellow at Stanford Law School Center on the Legal Profession and author of Virtual Law Practice: How to Deliver Legal Services Online (2nd Ed. ABA 2015).

Working paper published on March 13, 2015 and available on SSRN

Excerpt: Introduction and Part II

[Footnotes omitted. They . . . [more]

Posted in: Thursday Thinkpiece

Thursday Thinkpiece: Burningham on Courts, Challenges and Cures

Each Thursday we present a significant excerpt, usually from a recently published book or journal article. In every case the proper permissions have been obtained. If you are a publisher who would like to participate in this feature, please let us know via the site’s contact form.

Courts, Challenges, and Cures: Legal Avenues for Patients with Rare Diseases to Challenge Health Care Coverage Decisions

Sarah Burningham | University of Saskatchewan College of Law
(2015) 1 Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law 317

Excerpt: Part III

[Footnotes omitted. They can be found in the original via the link above]

III. . . . [more]

Posted in: Thursday Thinkpiece